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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
the minister of intelligence and aatomic energy last week and he said to me if the assad regime falls it will be bad for the iranian regime. and he said "iran needs to lose this game in syria." so whether the israelis are correct or not, whether it will turn out that the devil they knew was better, they don't think so and they think that, in fact, iran will be less emboldened if they lose assad, their key arab ally in the region. >> ifill: is it fair to say, margaret, that whether we're talking about turkey's role or jordan's role, the u.s. role or israel's role, all of this circles back to iran? >> you know, it does, gwen, it really does. all these countries, one, are concerned about iranian influence in the region. two, are concerned about iran's nuclear weapons program and, three, some would say there's the sort of sunni/shiite divide which seems to become more and more a fault line in this arab and persian world. so it is very interesting that, for instance, as you know the israelis and the turks have not been getting along at all ever since the flotilla incident a couple of years
give life, you know, give birth, men have the destructive energy, the destructive force and women might not be able to, you know, pull the trigger. of course, arguments about what about pms, would women be able to act rationally during that period? [laughter] would they be somewhat immobilized? how are they going to have supplies in the battle? are they going to have instead of, you know, cartridges in their belt, are they going to have tampons? [laughter] now it seems antiquated. it was the '90s which doesn't feel, i don't feel that old, but -- [laughter] these were common arguments. and sometimes what was guidance got sort of twisted into policies or practices that really sort of undermined the integration of women. for example, in the army there was guidance that, you know, for healthful purposes women should shower every 72 hours. but then i was in a number of units where somehow that was taken as policy x they said women can't be in combat because women must have showers every 72 hours. [laughter] and there are places where i visited where they were doing extended training exercise
center for energy this was pretty hot halftime show. this happened after that. do you think beyonce had anything to do with this in your expert opinion? >> well it is hard to tell right now. very well could have. i guess we'll have to look at the sequence of events to see when the power outage actually occurred and when the show actually ended and how much stress anything from that show may have put on the electrical infrastructure within the super boehm but right now there really isn't enough evidence to suggest either way that it was caused by the electrical stresses from that show or not. >> there was a lot of energy, certainly during that show. >> yeah. jenna: there is a joint statement released by entergy, new orleans, the power provider to the stadium superdome, the superdome operator. could you translate this for us this is jar most don't understand. a piece of equipment designed to monitor electrical load sensed an be a normality in the system. wins the issue was detected the sensing equipment operated as designed and opened a breaker causing power to be partially cut. what does
this huge dip with all the energy and rain that went through southern california and arizona. that is all on the move. when that hits the really warm air in the midwest today, we'll get a rare january severe weather outbreak, possibly tornadoes. we hit the high in kansas city at midnight by 5 degrees. it's crazy. you don't hear of stuff like that. because of all that and the big storm coming through, we have a severe weather risk coming through, the state of arkansas has to watch out for tornadoes later on tonight. nothing like that in the west. we're watching actually a calmer weather forecast. although with the jet stream still diving down, we still have energy coming through the west. a few showers from seattle to portland. boise and salt lake city dealing with a little rain and snow mix depending on your elevation. it's quieter on the west than in the heartland, that's heart to . all the weather always starts in the west. they had the rain and stormy, and it's going to be worse in the middle of the country. did you see these pictures yet? >> no. >> out of australia. they had the bibli
'll have the details. >>> and a new warning about energy drinks as they gain if popularity among teens. >>> and sunny's favorite story of the morning. beyonce explains what really happened at the inauguration. >>> welcome back, everybody. we're getting more insight today into the unemployment situation before this morning's january jobs report, payroll company adp said private employers added 192,000 jobs this month. unemployment should be at 7.3% for the third straight month. >>> older workers are not making way for younger once. almost two-thirds of americans between 45 and 60 plan to delay retirement. it's a steep increase from a few years ago. the reasons, financial losses, lay yaufr, and income stagnation. >>> you may have a tough time finding cold and flu medicine at the floor. millions of bottles of theraflu and triaminic are being recalled because kids can open the bottles without taking off the child-resistant packaging. >>> the nation's pediatricians say adolescents don't know enough about the energy drinks. too college students are mixing them with alcohol. >>> the justice d
of living is going up. health care cost, food, energy, everything is getting more expensive. and even if you have these depreciating dollars what kind of yields can you have? you can't get 1% on your money in the bank. melissa: so depressing. come on, i will be weeping here soon. rescue me from here since. >> i was thinking same thing. no wonder these two feel bad how things look. the important thing to realize about a survey you cited it is a snapshot of consumer sentiment at time. it is not really entirely predictive what their behavior will look like. how are you file financially and how are you feeling secure. melissa: aren't they looking at their 401(k) when they're seeing something like this. >> looking at people 45 to 60. in your 40s do you have any sense what you will retire. you're thinking what will the job market look like. hearing talk about entitlement reform. you're thinking i'm not sure social security and medicare will be around when i retire so i will have to stay longer in the workforce. this is more indicative what people think about today rather than what they do down the
to watch a stock after the chief steps down. so take a look at chesapeake energy. the top guy will retire as chief executive on april 1, aubrey mcclendon invested personally in the company drilling operations and is under investigation for mixing personal and company business. he is leaving taking a golden parachute of $50 million that goes with him. so let's see how the stock performs today. this is do-or-die day for research in motion. we will ask if it is good enough to save rim. and what happened between jon stuart and rob custis on "the daily show" last night? twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of pri
, and it came up with recommendations like they should retrofit federal buildings to be more energy efficient. these are ideas that have been kicking around all over the place for years, so it just never came up with anything. the president didn't seem to invest any energy in it, and you know, the unemployment rate now is 7.9%, and it's that in part because so many people have been discouraged and dropped out of the work force. >> byron, we're at the beginning of a new year. we're all looking for big ideas for the economy. who has big ideas for this economy, whether it's dreamt or republican or polka dot? where are the big ideas for really moving in economy forward this year? >> i would not character eyes either side as having big ideas as much as conflicting ideas. republicans really, really, really want to cut federal spending, get the debt under control. president obama wants to preserve more spending, wants to cut the deficit by racing taxes. there are two different ideas of how to handle the economy. president obama won the election. the democratic party won the senate, and the republica
, not being able to move, not being able to expend that energy and then possibly this idea of autism or aspergers and not having structure that he's used to that helps him survive and function, all of that taken away, it was a horrendous, horrendous experience and even though he's doing well now, down the road we see that it will come back to him through some sort of acute stress disorder, or ptsd, along with a nightmare, the depression, the anxiety. his mother's going to have to show him a lot of love, which i know she will. >> is he going to be able to recover from this? is there enough therapy? is there enough love that can help this little boy through his life as he gets older? >> he certainly will be able to survive. he may even thrive. and he'll do well in his life. but this is something that will stay with him, as it has with the previous person who talked about her experience in california. we see when children go through this, no matter how resilient they are, suzanne, that at some point in their lives it plays itself back, even if they hear it happening to someone else. it
in the short term and lay the foundation for long- term. we need a new energy policy. the most important numbers are the cost of money and the cost of energy and we have an opportunity to keep the cost of energy down and do it in a clean, green way. these are things we need to focus on to make the economy more competitive and they will create jobs. host: the headline in "the washington post." senators outlined immigration overhaul plan. what should be done? guest: the proposal addresses any the things we need to do. if you think about the world globally, people around the world are almost laughing at our immigration policy. people want to come to this country and create jobs. half of the fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or children of immigrants. will we say that in 75 years? if you look at companies that went public in the technology industry that received venture capital he -- capital, 90% were founded by immigrants. this is an important issue for keeping the best and the brightest in this country. there is also another category of workers needed, and i think the propos
has done a lot of investment with the green energy renewables. he hasn't really talked about it. that's a problem not just about rhetoric, helping the american people understand why this is important and why we need political action on this. >> give me an example of the fear mongering you referred to. >> well, the house republicans, you know, the classic global warming is a hoax. it will destroy the economy if we try to do anything on carbon tax, put any kind of price own electricity for fossil fuels, the whole, the entire u.s. economy is dependent upon cheap gas. if we change anything in that equation, everything will fall apart. there is a clear rhetoric that goes back for decades. the power industry is very good at saying if you raise the price of electricity and force us to put scrubbers on coal plants, we can't guarantee the viability of the plants and the investment is so huge people won't be able to afford to heat their homes. there is a lot of rhetoric any time you want to mess with the status quo. >> jeff, why do you think he will need to rally popular support on this? why do
's that same year -- that will help montana to lead america to energy independence. with responsible dwo. our poll, with oil and gas, hydropower, biofuel, the geothermal capacity. we are creating jobs and strength. ing our rural economies. for some communities in eastern montana, the rapid growth associated with the energy boom is created immediate infrastructure challenges. that's why i'm h i've proposed creating a grant program for communities effected by oil and gas development. i ask that we're invest $15 million in providing matching funds to effective cities and towns, areas that don't always get a share of the increased revenue, the county l government and school distinct receive from oil and gas development. there are challenges but there's opportunities for the whole state with this development. i do hope that you'll join me in addressing those challenges. [applause] [applause] we must also meet our spoonlt to fix the long-term problem created by our predecessors. i have outline a detailed plan that will shore up the public retirement system and do so without raising taxes. i look fo
this morning. >> on tomorrow morning, a look at the u.s. auto industry. we'll discuss our environmental energy affects the auto industry. and talk about auto safety and federal regulation. our guest is matt blunt, head of the auto -- automotive policy council. to promote the role of the auto industry in the my. we're live on washington journey every day on 7:00 eastern. >> one can't count the times that americans say we're the best country in the world. what a stupid thing to say. everyone thinks the country is pretty good. why do we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? why do we have to assert it? all of the time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, information products go around the world, in every corner of the world. we teach them not to like us. >> author and activist and transafrica founder, randall robinson. in depth, three hours live on "book tv" on c-span2. >> the senate yesterday confirmed john kerry to the secretary of state. governor deval patrick named his replacement for senator kerry. he named william cowan to the senat
? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop taking chantix and
and the contact list and the volunteer energy that got president obama reelected, use that to get his agenda passed in his second term. nobody has ever done this before. but the obama folks are doing it. they have now started that effort with gun safety and with immigration. and if you think about just gun safety in particular, it makes sense, right? if it is traditionally too hard to get the politics of this done, then you better bring nontraditional means to bear if you want to get it done this time. and using the president's campaign apparatus to get it done is definitely a nontraditional way of doing it. but when organizing for action puts out what appears to be the very first solicitation to that giant list on a policy issue, when they urge the millions of recipients on the mailing list to call their member of congress immediately and to tell them to get behind the president's proposals on gun reform, that call your congressman right now e-mail went out at 4:26 p.m. on a friday afternoon. specifically, on a friday afternoon when neither the house nor the senate were in session. really?
'd go across the board so much, i'd go commerce, labor, education, interior, energy. are you kidding me? i would slash everything. i would take out at least a quarter. at least a quarter. i don't care, sequester, i don't even know what it means. what i know is let's get rid of these goofy departments that are bankrupting america. what's your take on that? >> well, got to disagree with you. >> oh. [ laughter ] >> i think that there's certainly a time and place for cuts. as you say earlier, it's usually when the economy is working a little bit better than it is now. i think if you look back historically, the best time for cuts is back to trend growth, which is 3%, not the 2% economy that we're in now. i'll tell you, i just came last week from the world economic forum, one of the big conversation threads there was that we don't want to be europe. europe has gone too far with austerity. and you might say well that's a liberal point of view. but i'll tell you, the american enterprise institute came out with a report this week saying we should take lessons from overseas. we should not do aust
on honest people, and spend a little bit of that rhetoric and a little bit of that energy going after violent criminals of complete breakdown of our criminal justice system and the fact we don't even prosecute criminals with guns anymore, because the system has collapsed, maybe then we would make progress. >> also at some point we have got to say enough is enough. otherwise when the nra will not say that you should not permit the civilian sale of bazookas. what we're talking about is a weapon crafted for war that floats around the streets of our cities, that puts our police in a position of being outgunned by the bad guys, that has kids killing kids with them. >> since the newtown, connecticut, shooting that left 27 dead, the nra says 500,000 more people have joined its membership. >>> anderson cooper, don't miss this, taking on the gun violence debate tomorrow night. he'll take a good long look at both sides of the issue. we're calling it "guns under fire," a town hall special tomorrow, 8:00 p.m. eastern, only here on cnn. >>> just ahead, a nightmare on the school bus. we will take y
are off, you don't have to appeal to the high energy members of your party. when the cameras are off is when you get to sit down and get to business and get the work done. >> what are you studying? >> political science. >> what do you want to do? >> be a politician. [laughter] >> how you feel after tonight? >> it's going to be a very long journey. [laughter] >> we wish you luck. the last comment tonight from the bipartisan policy center. your thoughts? tell us what you thought and what your conclusion is. >> a couple of reflections. it is great to have this kind of fusion cabinet discussion with multiple layers of government, supporters and political commentators. that does not happen all whole lot. two things occurred to me. the mayor made a great point about how messy this is. the idea of the public getting comfortable with that messiness is going to be another part of the political cover. to have the opportunity to make the uncomfortable agreements that will be necessary. it was not really just a partisan question. the local, state, and federal government positions are critical fo
? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ with fancy feast mornings gourmet cat food. suddenly,(announcer) ces don'make mornings special, mornings are delicious protein rich entrees with garden veggies and egg. fancy feast mornings. the best ingredient is love. new honey bunches of oats greek yohere we go.ole grain. honey cornflakes and chunks of greek yogurt. i'm tasting both the yogurt and the honey at the same time. i'm like digging this yogurt thing. i feel healthy. new honey bunches of oats greek. trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - compani
invest in things that are growing jobs, particularly energy. i'm just saying this should be a sign to those in politics, don't play with this. there's so many good things. there's a lot of corporate money overseas waiting to come back. profits are up. it's just waiting for that last one or two levers to be pushed. and hopefully we as a country and the congress can do it. >> we want to get kelly o'donnell in on the testimony. for that we go to the testimony that took place on capitol hill yesterday. former congresswoman gabrielle giffords who survived a mass shooting in arizona two years ago made an unexpected appearance before the senate judiciary committee, reading off a page of handwritten prepared remarks. she urged congress to act now on gun reform. >> too many children are dying. too many children. we must do something. it will be hard. but the time is now. you must act. be bold. be courageous. americans are counting on you. thank you. >> that says it all. giffords' husband, mark kelly, says expanding background checks for gun buyers should be a top priority, but the nra's chi
. millions of people either lost their jobs or saw their wages fall. food and energy prices went up for many middle and low-income people. everyday costs like rent, utility and food became more difficult and in many cases families were forced to choose between food and electricity. even before the recession started, tens of millions of americans went hungry at some point during the year. that, too, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap t
: there is no reason those who work in clean energy not to mention the growth of the entire economy should be put in jeopardy because folks in washington could not come together to eliminate special interest tax loopholes. >> jennifer: he's urging congress to pass a short-term budget that would delay the deep budget cuts known as sequestration. those are going to take affect next month. the president's plan would include spending cuts and increases in revenue, a balanced approach. in a statement house speaker responded to the proposal saying we believe there is a better way to reduce the deficit. the president's sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms. that will start us on the path to balancing the budget in ten years. there is no balance in terms of revenue. the question is are congress and the white house headed for yet another big showdown. to come to us from washington to answer that question is karen bass from california. thank you for coming to the war room. >> thank you for having me again. >> jennifer: you bet. so the republicans are saying that obama's plan as he ann
into the third quarter, elevators, escalators, half the stadium went dark. despite using limited energy off the power grid. the superdome's electrical system got that million-dollar upgrade last december. utility company entergy said some abnormality still triggered the partial system shutdown. "60 minutes sports" was rolling when the problem happened. >> uh-oh. >> we lost light. frank? we lost the a.c. >> reporter: what does that mean? >> that means that we have to do the bus time -- >> what's that mean? >> that means a 20-minute delay. >> reporter: law enforcement determined quickly it wasn't an act of terrorism or hacking. with so many systems used during the super bowl, turning the lights back on was not easy. >> very complicated system. there's scoring equipment, telephone switches, coaches' headsets. all of those things get affected. >> reporter: at a press conference monday, nfl commissioner roger goodell dismissed the idea that the halftime show was to blame. >> to say that beyonce's halftime show has something to do with it is not the case from anything we have at this point. >> th
. energy secretary stephan chu is stepping down from his post. is he coming off a rocky first term. highly criticized for 528-million-dollar loan to solyndra the now bankrupt solar panel company. he will stay on until his replacement is named. here is clayton. >>, thank you, mike. getting a spin off. just for conservatives. right wing posters say they were sick of quote liberal censorship on facebook. starting their own site called the tea party community. and officially launches today but, get. this they already have 100,000 members and they haven't even launched yet. so the co-founder ken crow joins me live this morning. good morning, ken. >> good morning clayton from south florida. how are you today. >> i'm final. >> tell me how in the world 100,000 members already and you haven't even launched yet? >> well, i believe clayton we have to thank our friend, mr. zuckerburg for that. he was very instrumental in helping us out. >> meaning mark zuckerberg the founder of facebook because you have had a lot of criticism there has been a lot of censorship, you say, happening against you and other
expand all of our energy pushing for immigration reform while we know our communities are continuing to be separated, and really do to a flawed system. >> very quickly, can you tell us your own story, how you came to the u.s. and became to be a dreamer activist? >> i came to the u.s. -- actually, i lost my right leg when i was 2.5 while in peru. because of medical reasons, my treatment was in the united states at shriners hospital. my parents decided to move when i was 10 years old. i found out i was undocumented when i was graduating from high school and wanting to pursue higher education. i really got involved in the trina movement -- i think is a miracle. i consider myself to be very privileged for being a to speak out on these issues, but also to be part of a beautiful and powerful community. what the dreamer community did for me is allow me to reclaim my identity. it reminded me being undocumented is not something to be ashamed of, but to the crowd. and we ultimately define our identity and our ability to reflect change. i eventually in 2010 was very frustrated by the lack of co
testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems b
: that jay carney clip is classic. not the global economy, not the energy glut. head wings in the house. >>steve: the hyde park neighborhood, 832 east 57th street. that is the house whereas a child ronald reagan survived a near fatal bout of pneumonia in 1915. you know what? that is in a neighborhood that the university of chicago wants to buy that house, tear it down, and put up a parking lot. a parking lot -- a parking lot perhaps -- how ironic is this -- for the barack obama presidential library. >>brian: i blame the city of chicago. they should have made this a landmark. >>gretchen: they claim it is not a landmark, although they have delayed this process now a couple of times. the ronald reagan childhood home has survived now since december. they got a stay, so to speak, in january. it's still not exactly clear what is going to happen here, although the bulldozers are sitting nearby ready to go. what do you think about this story? should that happen or should it become a landmark? >>brian: or should the president say, listen, if my library, if i have to steam roll ronald reagan's ho
energy. read more about these mysterious forces and what scientists hope to find on our science page. and think you've received bad advice about social security? our benefits guru gets to the bottom of that issue in today's "ask larry" column on our business page. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll return to the immigration debate with a look at the president's plans for reform. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> su
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)